Topic Archives: Corporate Form

September 6, 2017Corporate Form

When and How to “B” – Responsible B Corp Conversion

There continues to be a lot of press around B Corps—not surprising given the marketing expertise of the B Lab founding team and the staff that it has hired. More importantly, the B Corp movement has been embraced by an increasingly wide audience. It is no longer solely the purview of socially and progressively minded liberals, willing or able to sacrifice returns for positive impact. It is now employed by publicly traded ...›

Why a hybrid structure?

When people ask which impact investors inspire us, one team consistently rises to the top: Omidyar Network. Since its founding 14 years ago, Omidyar Network has led a small revolution in the impact investing and philanthropic community. Not only has it dedicated over $1 billion to initiatives working to solve some of the world’s greatest problems, it has redefined how the world thinks about capitalizing these initiatives. ...›

November 21, 2016Corporate Form

Finding the Right Legal Structure for UK Social Entrepreneurs

A team of London-based Morrison & Foerster attorneys assisted Thomson Reuters Foundation and UnLtd, the leading provider of support to social entrepreneurs in the UK, with developing the “UK Social Venture Structuring Guide.” The interactive guide was built to help social entrepreneurs in the UK determine the best legal structure for their social venture. Through ...›

September 27, 2016Corporate Form, Deal Structures

From “To B or Not To B”

1. A “B Corporation” is Not a New Corporate Form A “B Corporation” or “B Corp” is a certification mark – like a “Good Housekeeping” seal of approval or “LEED” certification.  B Labs has done a very good job of creating a framework for companies to evaluate their business and operations on ESG factors and to then receive a score or ranking.  ...›

September 20, 2016Corporate Form, Resources

Social Enterprise Legislation in the United States: An Overview

Traditionally, corporate decision-making has been driven by the singular goal of maximizing shareholder value.  Increasingly, however, businesses seek to pursue a social or environmental mission alongside profit.   Such so-called “social enterprises” may find that fiduciary duties associated with the traditional corporate form limit the corporation’s ability to achieve mission.  Accordingly, mission-oriented for-profit entities may consider ...›